Groundworks

Groundworks Health and Safety Documents

If you are a groundworker, managing health and safety compliance can be daunting. However, you can now access various quality health and safety documents designed explicitly for ground workers. These documents are aimed at lessening the load on your administrative tasks, allowing you to focus on your core duties.

HSEDocs offers a comprehensive range of health and safety documents, each one tailored to meet the unique needs of groundworkers. From COSHH Assessments and Manual Handling to item-specific Risk Assessments and a Modern Slavery Policy, we understand your specific challenges and have designed these documents to address them.

To ensure that you have everything you need for health and safety compliance, HSEDocs has put together a Groundworks Health and Safety Pack. This pack contains a range of different groundworks-specific health and safety documents designed to help ensure the safety of your workers. Additionally, these documents provide all necessary documentation to achieve the Health and Safety Gold Standard Award.

With the Groundworks Health and Safety Pack, you can be confident that you are taking all of the necessary steps to protect your workers and comply with health and safety regulations. This pack is not just a collection of documents, it's your shield, ensuring that you are always one step ahead in safety compliance. So why not take advantage of this opportunity and make your job easier today?

 

The safety and well-being of workers and the public are of the utmost importance in groundworks. To minimise the potential risks associated with such work, it is crucial to have a comprehensive set of health and safety documents in place. These documents comprise various assessments and guidelines that help identify potential hazards and provide preventive measures.

One of the most crucial groundwork documents is a Risk Assessment for specific groundwork tasks. These assessments cover a range of activities, including fencing, handling tools, working with concrete and brickwork, and even asbestos awareness. By having these assessments in place, workers can identify potential hazards and take the necessary precautions to prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses from occurring in the workplace.

Another essential document to draw from is the Manual Handling guidelines. These guidelines provide detailed instructions on safely lifting and moving heavy objects, reducing the likelihood of back injuries and other physical strains. By following the Manual Handling guidelines, workers can prevent injuries and maintain their health and well-being.

Method Statements provide a comprehensive outline of tasks and associated risks involved in a particular job. This document helps to identify potential hazards and provides preventive measures to minimise the risks. The Method Statements are beneficial in ensuring that the workers know the possible dangers and how to handle them safely.

Then there’s the COSHH Assessment. This assessment aims to identify hazardous substances that could harm workers or the public. It helps to determine the level of exposure to these substances and the necessary precautions to mitigate the risks. The COSHH Assessment is vital in ensuring that workers know the potential hazards and how to handle the substances safely.

Lastly, there’s the Company Health and Safety Policy. As an employer, if you have more than five employees, including managers, secretaries, directors, etc., you must have a written Company Health and Safety Policy. Even though a written policy becomes legally binding only when your company has at least five employees, it is always better to have a policy in place, even if it is not mandatory. Such a policy has numerous benefits, including enhancing your company's reputation and increasing your chances of being accepted in various supply chains. Therefore, it is advisable to consider having a policy to help ensure your employees' safety and well-being while complying with legal obligations and industry standards.

In summary, having a comprehensive set of health and safety documents is critical in the groundwork field. These documents help identify potential hazards, provide preventive measures, and ensure the safety and well-being of workers and the public.

Excavating trenches is a vital and often necessary task in construction and civil engineering projects. However, it is a high-risk activity that involves various potential dangers, such as cave-ins, falling objects, exposure to hazardous materials, and accidents caused by heavy machinery. Hence, it is crucial to prioritise safety and take all necessary precautions to avoid accidents and ensure a secure work environment.

Every year, people working in excavations are at risk of being killed or seriously injured by collapses and falling materials. They can be buried or injured if the excavation collapses or if materials fall from the sides into the excavation. In addition, people or plant equipment can fall into excavations. It's essential to remember that no ground can be relied upon to stand unsupported in all circumstances. A cubic metre of soil can weigh more than 1.5 tonnes, depending on the conditions. Therefore, trenchless techniques should always be considered during the design stage as they replace the need for major excavations.

Prior to digging any trench, pit, tunnel, or other excavation, it is important to determine the temporary support that will be needed and plan the necessary precautions. It is crucial to ensure that all necessary equipment and precautions, such as trench sheets, props, baulks, etc., are available on-site before starting any work.

Additionally, battering the excavation sides to a safe angle of repose can make the excavation even safer. The slope angle should be less than the natural angle of repose of the excavated material in granular soils. A considerably flatter slope will be required for maximum safety in wet soil conditions.

Loose materials may fall from spoil heaps into the excavation, threatening workers' safety. To prevent this, edge protection must be installed, such as toeboards or other means like projecting trench sheets or box sides. It is also crucial to wear head protection.

Plant and vehicles should not be parked close to excavation sides to avoid their collapse. The additional loadings can make the sides more vulnerable to collapse, leading to accidents and injuries.

It is crucial to use substantial barriers around the edges to prevent people from falling into excavations. This can be achieved using guard rails and toe boards inserted into the ground next to the excavated side or fabricated guard rail assemblies that connect to the sides of the trench box. Another option is to extend the support system by using trench box extensions or trench sheets that are longer than the trench depth. These measures will help ensure the safety of workers and prevent any accidents or injuries from occurring.

It is essential to ensure that excavation work does not weaken the foundations of surrounding buildings or walls, scaffold footings, or buried services. Even small trenches can undermine shallow foundations, causing walls to collapse onto those working in the trench. Therefore, assessing the need for additional structural support before digging commences is essential. In some cases, a survey of the foundations and advice from a structural engineer may be necessary.

Depending on the ground's permeability, water may flow into any excavation below the natural groundwater level. The supports on the sides of the excavation should be designed to control the entry of groundwater and take into account any additional water loading. Special attention must be given to areas close to lakes, rivers, and the sea.

Water entering the excavation should be channelled to sumps from where it can be pumped out. However, the effect of pumping from sumps on the excavation's stability should be considered. Designers will also need to consider alternative techniques for de-watering, such as ground freezing and grout injection.

Providing a safe way to enter and exit an excavation is essential. If a risk assessment identifies ladders as a reasonable option for access and egress, they must be suitable and robust enough for the job at hand. Additionally, they should be placed on a firm and level base, securely fastened to prevent slipping, and extended at least 1 meter above the landing place unless an alternative handhold is provided.

It's crucial to consider hazardous fumes when working in an excavation. Do not use petrol or diesel engines without arranging for the fumes to be safely ducted away or providing adequate forced ventilation. Avoid placing petrol or diesel-engine equipment, such as generators or compressors, in or near the edge of an excavation, as exhaust gases can collect and accumulate.

By following these safety precautions and procedures, the risk of accidental mishaps is greatly reduced. This helps prevent injuries and creates a safe working environment for everyone involved in the trenching project.

Groundworks health and safety pack. BEST OFFER
£85.00
Civil engineering health and safety pack. BEST OFFER
£75.00
Company Health and Safety Policy - GENERAL
£85.00
COSHH Assessment Example - cement
FREEDOWNLOAD
Demolish brickwork (Non load bearing) Risk Assessment
£8.99
180 and 360 degree excavators Risk Assessment
£8.99
Hedge cutting, strimming and lawn mowing Risk Assessment
£8.99
Underpinning Risk Assessment
£8.99
Underground drainage. Risk Assessment
£8.99
Dig out trenches Risk Assessment
£8.99
Take up slabs Risk Assessment
£8.99
Laying slabs Risk Assessment
£8.99
Renew concrete floor Risk Assessment
£8.99
Pumping, pouring and finishing concrete Risk Assessment
£8.99
Soil or clay floor dig out Risk Assessment
£8.99
Fencing Risk Assessment
£8.99
Breaking out concrete Risk Assessment
£8.99
Block paving Risk Assessment
£8.99
Brick and blockwork Risk Assessment
£8.99
Jack Hammer Risk Assessment
£8.99
Asbestos awareness Risk Assessment
£8.99
General groundworks and fencing Risk Assessment
£8.99
Kango Risk Assessment
£8.99
Slips, trips and falls Risk Assessment
£8.99
Cement mixer Risk Assessment
£8.99
Forklift truck Risk Assessment
£8.99
Manual Handling Risk Assessment
£8.99
Breaking out concrete floor Method Statement
£8.99
Demolish wall and footings Method Statement
£8.99
Block paving Method Statement
£8.99
Fencing Method Statement
£8.99
Underpinning Method Statement
£8.99
Underground drainage Method Statement
£8.99
Paving slabs Method Statement
£8.99
Hedge cutting, strimming and lawn mowing Method Statement
£8.99
Dig out and concrete foundations and trenches Method Statement
£8.99
Brick and block work Method Statement
£8.99
WD40 COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Two stroke oil COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Tanking slurry COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Pva COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Petrol COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Patio and driveway sealer COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Glyphosate Weed Killer COSHH Assessment Form
£8.99
Mortar waterproofer COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Mortar plasticiser COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Line marking paint COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Hydraulic lime COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Hydrated lime COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Hand wipes COSHH
£8.99
Dust COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Diesel COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Cement and brick dust COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Concrete hardener and sealer COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Cement dye COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Brick and patio cleaner (Eco) COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Brick and patio cleaner (Acid) COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Machine Oil COSHH assessment form
£8.99
Ronseal wood Filler COSHH Assessment Form
£8.99
Sand COSHH Assessment
£8.99

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